Category Archives: Dodd-Frank

Is It Time To Hire a Criminal Defense Lawyer?

The intriguing and continuously unfolding Wal-Mart Mexican bribery story brings up an issue of great importance to executives these days: when it is time to find yourself a good criminal defense lawyer? After all, with Sarbanes-Oxley, Dodd-Frank, and the Foreign … Continue reading

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What to do when your successful business unit is sold

Success is sometimes rewarded in strange ways, such as when a company sells off a highly profitable business unit in order to raise cash (as Nestle did when it bought Cadbury and as Barnes & Noble is considering doing with … Continue reading

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“Say on Pay” Hasn’t Hurt Exec Compensation–Yet

There’s clearly some nervousness among executives these days, given that shareholders now have a “say on pay.” But by most accounts, they don’t need to be all that nervous. “Say on pay” is a provision of Dodd-Frank that allows shareholders to cast an advisory … Continue reading

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Blowing the Whistle Still a Risky Proposition

Whistleblowing remains perilous territory for executives, even with the protections offered by 2002’s Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the financial incentives offered by 2010’s Dodd-Frank Act. Yet there is a powerful argument to be made that executives with information about possible shareholder … Continue reading

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